In The News

Collingwood Today; 'recognizing volunteer efforts to preserve much-loved ship.'

IN THE NEWS
Honouring The Incredible Legacy of the SS Keewatin
4 January 2021

'The SS Keewatin is the last Edwardian passenger steamship of its kind in the world. Five years older than the Titanic, it was one of just six ships owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway. 

Built in Glasgow, Scotland, it was designed with comfort, class and beauty in mind. It was part of the Great Lakes steamship fleet and took its maiden voyage in September of 1907.

The liner used to sail between Port Arthur/Fort William (now Thunder Bay) on Lake Superior and Port McNicoll on Georgian Bay, transporting passengers and freight. The journey took two and a half days. 

The ship was retired at Port McNicoll at the end of November in 1965. It was in danger of being scrapped until 1967, when RJ Peterson of Douglas, Michigan, purchased it. He towed the SS Keewatin to Lake Kalamazoo, established it as a maritime museum and cared for it lovingly for 45 years. In June of 2012, the ship was brought back to Port McNicoll, thanks to local developer Skyline Investments and the RJ and Diane Peterson Charity (Friends of Keewatin).

It is the last remaining Great Lakes passenger liner, representing a bygone era. It also demonstrates an attention to craftsmanship and opulence not likely to be seen again. All agree it is a wonderful piece of Canadian heritage and its legacy deserves to be honoured.'

'Skyline Investments, one of Ontario’s top players in hospitality properties with operations spanning North America, is fortunate to be able to share with the community such an important artifact of Canadian history. They are proud to play a role in its preservation and protection and to be able to honour its significance.

For several years, Skyline has actively searched for a long-term home for the notable ship. They wanted to ensure it would be cared for by an organization that was approved by the Department of Canadian Heritage.'

 

Read the full article published by CollingwoodToday.ca >